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ENSC 1015-1016: Foundations of Environmental Science

Why take it? | Student Testimonials | Student Work | Requirements

ENSC 1015 introduces students to the interrelationships between human activities and the environment, with an emphasis on biological, chemical, and physical principles that govern the flow of energy, materials, and information among physical, ecological, and human systems.

ENSC 1016 explores national and global perspectives on societal concerns about the environment and human sustenance, emphasizes the relationship between human systems and natural systems, and examines ecosystem services and land, water, and atmospheric resources.

Why take it?

Understanding the basic biological, chemical, and physical principles that govern the flow of energy, materials, and information among physical, ecological, and human systems is critical for both science and non-science majors. This course will allow students to understand how the world works and will emphasize the relationship between human systems and natural systems. This course will prepare the next generation of scientists, teachers, policy makers, citizens, and leaders to meet future challenges and protect our fragile planet.

ENSC 1015-1016 fulfills an elective in the Blue Planet, Civic Agriculture and Food Systems, and Pathways to Sustainability Pathways minors.

"More than anything else, this course is about what it might take to keep the Earth a habitable planet. Some people say that we have already created conditions that spell our species’ doom. Others see us as being on a very slippery slope that could lead to our extinction.  Yet others who have considered such matters say there are no serious concerns for the Earth’s ability to support all its human inhabitants – no matter how many of us there may eventually be. A much larger number of people probably have no well-formed opinion about such matters at all. But these issues are so large and the consequences of being wrong are so potentially unthinkable that no one should be uninformed about them. During this semester we will read, talk, and think about things that can help us develop or refine a defensible, not-too-rigid opinion about the state of the Earth and what its future may hold for human habitation.” 
– Professor, Dr. Matt Eick

What are students saying about this course?

“[Dr. Eick is] very passionate about what he is teaching!! [He] helped my desire to learn more about the subject matter.”

“Great professor, was passionate about the material he was teaching and also provided real life examples that demonstrated how the subject matter could be applied to our lives.”

“Dr. Eick was good at bringing in multiple perspectives for environmental issues and also created activities that challenged our creativity in making the future brighter for the environment.”

Examples of Student Work

Check out these PSAs created by ENSC 1015 students…

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Requirements

There are no prerequisites for this course.

This course fulfills Pathways requirements in Reasoning in the Natural Sciences and Intercultural and Global Awareness.

For more information, email Dr. Matthew Eick.